Wikipedia survey III (Recognition, Effects)

It’s been quite some time now since my last post about the Wikipedia survey results, and for that I must apologize. I was side-tracked by some unrelated projects and found it hard to get back to the survey. But I’ve just finished revising my article on this topic (which will be published in the November 2012 issue of The Translator), and that made me sit down to finish blogging about the survey results. This is the third of four posts. I had planned to look at motivations, effects and recognition all in one post, but it became too long, so I’ve split it into two. This one looks at the ways respondents were recognized for participating in crowdsourced projects and what impact (if any) their participation has had on their lives. The next one (which I will post later this week), looks at respondents’ motivations for participating in crowdsourced initiatives.

For anyone who comes across these posts after the article is published, I should mention that the discrepancy between the number of survey respondents in the article and on this blog (75 vs. 76) is because I received another response to the survey after I’d submitted the article for peer review. It was easier to include all 76 responses here, since I’m creating new graphs and looking at survey responses I didn’t have space to explore in the Translator article, but I didn’t update the data in the article because the new response didn’t change much on its own (+/-0.5% here and there) and would have required several hours work to recalculate the figures I cited throughout the 20+ pages.

I also want to thank Brian Harris for discussing these survey results on his blog. You can read his entry here or visit his blog, Unprofessional Translation, to read a number of very interesting articles about translation by non-professionals, including those working in situations of conflict, war, and natural disasters.

And on to the survey results:

Recognition
The survey asked respondents what (if any) recognition they had received for participating in a crowdsourced translation initiative. Although the question asked about the last initiative in which respondents had participated (rather than Wikipedia in particular), 63 of the 76 respondents indicated that Wikipedia was the last initiative in which they had been involved, so the responses are mainly representative of the recognition they received as Wikipedia translators. Here’s a chart summarizing the responses (click on it for a full-sized image):
wikipedia translators-recognition
As the chart illustrates, no respondents received financial compensation, either directly, by being paid for their work, or indirectly, by being offered a discount on their membership fees or other services. This really isn’t surprising, though, because most respondents were Wikipedia translators, and contributors to Wikipedia (whether translators or writers) are not paid for their work. In addition, since Wikipedia does not charge membership fees, there is nothing to discount. Unexpectedly, though, 20 respondents reported receiving no recognition at all–even though 17 of them listed Wikipedia as the last initiative in which they had been involved. Because Wikipedia records the changes made to its pages, anyone who had translated an article would have been credited on the history page. These 20 respondents may not have been aware of the history feature, or–more likely–they didn’t consider it a form a recognition.[*]

Receiving credit for the translation work (either directly beside the translation or via a profile page) was the most common type of recognition. Of the 18 respondents who selected “Other”, 10 reported being credited on the Wikipedia article’s history page, 1 said their name appeared in the translated software’s source code, 1 noted they had received some feedback on the Wiki Talk page, 1 mentioned receiving badges from Facebook, and the others mentioned their motivations (e.g. just wanted to help, translation became better, could refer to the translation in other academic work) or the effect their involvement had on their careers (e.g. higher rate of pay for translating/interpreting duties at work). I discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this enhanced visibility for translators and translation in an article that will appear in Linguistica Antverpiensia later this year, so I won’t elaborate here, except to say that crediting translators, and providing a record of the changes made to translations makes translation a more visible activity and provides researchers with a large corpus of texts that can be compared and analyzed. In fact, I think Wikipedia’s translations are an untapped wealth of material that can help us better understand how translations are produced and revised by both professional and non-professional translators.

Effects
Finally, I asked respondents whether/how their participation in a crowdsourced translation initiative had impacted their lives. Here’s another chart that summarizes the results (again, click on the image to see it in full size):
Wikipedia translators-impact
I was surprised to see that 38 respondents (or 51%) didn’t feel their participation had had some sort of impact: after all, why they would continue volunteering if they were not getting something (even personal satisfaction) out of the experience? However, this may be a problem with the question itself, as I hadn’t listed “personal satisfaction” as an option. If I had, (and I would definitely make this change to the next survey), the responses might have been different. As it is, of the 16 respondents who selected “Other”, 8 indicated that participating gave them personal satisfaction, a sense of pride in their accomplishments, a feeling of gratification, etc. Here are a few of their comments:

Pride in my accomplishments, although I am an amateur translator. I did some cool stuff!

I have the immense satisfaction of knowing that my efforts are building a free information project and hope that my professionalism raises the quality bar for other contributors who see my work (e.g. edit summaries, citations of sources, etc.)

I was spending my spare time on Wikipedia and sharing my knowledge. Moreover I was enjoying what I was doing. That’s it.

As for the rest of the responses in the “Other” category: One person noted that they had been thanked by other Wikipedia users for the translation, another remarked that they had been thanked by colleagues for contributing to “open-source intellectual work”, two said they had learned new things, one had met new Facebook friends, one said they had been asked to do further translation work for the project, two noted they had been invited to participate in this survey, and one (a part-time translation professor) said “My students consider my classes as a useful and positive learning experience” because they help translate for Wikipedia together.

Nearly 1/3 of respondents (22 of the 76) felt they had received feedback that helped improve their translation skills, and I think this point is important: the open nature of Wikipedia (and many other crowdsourced projects) provides an excellent forum for exchanging ideas and commenting on the work of others. But this is also a point that deserves further study, since so few of the respondents reported having training or professional experience translating.

Interestingly, some of the more tangible effects of participating in a crowdsourced initiative, such as receiving job offers and meeting new clients or colleagues, were not often experienced by the survey respondents. I wonder whether the results would be the same if this survey were given to participants in other types of initiatives (translation of for-profit websites such as Facebook, or localization of Free/open-source software such as OmegaT). The results do show, however, that volunteering for crowdsourced translation initiatives has had some positive (and a few negative) effects on the careers and personal lives of the participants, and that personal satisfaction is also an important motivator.

[*]
An interesting aside is that of the 20 respondents who reported receiving no recognition, 5 also indicated they had received other forms of recognition, such as their names appearing beside the translation, an updated profile page, or feedback on their work. Respondents may have been thinking of all projects in which they had been involved, instead of the last one, which the question asked about. These 5 respondents all indicated that Wikipedia was the last initiative in which they had been involved.

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