Wikipedia survey I (Respondent profiles)

This is the first in a series of posts about the results of my survey of Wikipedians who have translated content for the Wikimedia projects (e.g. Wikipedia). Because I’ve already submitted an article analyzing the survey, these posts will be less analytical and more descriptive, although I will be able to discuss some of the survey questions I didn’t have space for in the paper. This post will look at the profiles of the 76 Wikipedians who responded to the survey (and whom I’d like to thank once again for their time).

Survey Methodology
I wanted to randomly invite Wikipedia translators to complete the survey, so I first consulted various lists of English translators (e.g. the Translators Available page and the Translation/French/Translators page) and added these usernames to a master list. Then, for each of the 279 languages versions on the List of Wikipedias page*, I searched for a Category: Translators page for translations from that language into English (ie. Category: Translators DE-EN, Category: Translators FR-EN, etc.). I added the usernames in the Category: Translators pages to the names on the master list, and removed duplicate users. This process led to a master list with the names of 1866 users who had volunteered to translate Wikipedia content into English. I then sent out invitations to 204 randomly selected users from the master list, and 76 (or 37%) of them responded. A few caveats: additional Wikipedians have probably translated content for the encyclopedia without listing themselves on any of the pages I just mentioned. Moreover, anyone can generally edit (and translate) Wikipedia pages without creating an account, so the results of the survey probably can’t be generalized for all English Wikipedia translators, let alone Wikipedia translators into the other 280 languages, who are not necessarily listed on the English Wikipedia pages I consulted. Finally, although 76 Wikipedians may not seem like many respondents, it is important to note that many of the users on the master list did not seem to have ever translated anything for Wikipedia: when I consulted their user contribution histories, I found that some Wikipedians had added userboxes to their profile pages to indicate their desire to translate but had not actually done anything else. I was interested only in the views of people who had actually translated, so the 76 respondents actually represents a much larger share of actual Wikipedia translators than it appears.

Profiles
The vast majority of the respondents (64 respondents, or 84%) were male and most were 35 years of age or younger (57 of the respondents, or 75% were under 36). This result is not surprising, given the findings of a 2008 general survey of more than 176,000 Wikipedia users, where 50% of the respondents were 21 years of age or under (in all, 76% were under 30) and 75% were male.

When respondents were asked about translation-related training, most (51 respondents or 68%) responded that they had no formal training in translation. Here’s a graph with a breakdown for each response:
Wikipdia translators-training

Given that respondents were generally young and usually did not have formal training in translation, it’s not surprising that 52 of the 76 respondents (68.4%) had never worked as translators (ie. they had never been paid to produce translations). Only 11 respondents (or about 14%) were currently working as translators on a full- or part-time basis, while 13 (or about 17%) had worked as translators in the past but were not doing so now. So it’s not surprising either that only two respondents were members of a professional association of translators.

Finally, when asked about their current occupations, respondents reported working in range of fields. I’ve grouped them as best I could, using the Occupational Structure proposed by Human Resources and Development Canada. Two respondents did not answer this question, but here’s an overview of the 74 other responses:

Occupation No. of respondents Percentage
Student
    6 High school students
    4 College/University students (languages)
    17 College/University students (other fields)
27 36%
Works in IT sector 11 15%
Works in language industry 9 12%
Works in another sector (e.g. graphic design, law, education) 8 11%
Works in business, finance or administration 7 9%
Unemployed/stay-at-home parent/retired 5 7%
Academic 3 4%
Engineer 2 3%
Works in sales and service industry 2 3%
Total: 74 100%

Later this week (or early next week), I’ll look at the types of crowdsourced translation initiatives the respondents were involved in (other than Wikipedia, of course), and the roles they played in these initiatives. After that, I’ll discuss respondent motivations for volunteering and the impact their participation has had on their lives.


* There are now 281 Wikipedia versions.

One thought on “Wikipedia survey I (Respondent profiles)

  1. thanx! This is interesting stuff! Yes, please send along the rest!

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